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the confidence of its most important factor. russia's envoy for medalist affairs says the rebels are gaining control -- envoy for middle east affairs says the rebels are gaining control. washington congratulated the kremlin for waking up to reality. >> the aftermath of a bombing in a damascus suburb. syrian official media said a car packed with explosives blew up near a school in this district to the southwest of the total, and that at least half of the casualties were women and children. "we were going to school when the explosion took place. i do not know anything about my parents. they may have died." this man says the victims were all students, or going to their places of work. after the explosion, the ground was full of bodies. the state news agency has blamed the violence on terrorists, its name for the rebels intensifying attacks on the government. this was the latest in a string of bombings in and around damascus. for the first time, russia has acknowledged the possibility of the rebels winning the civil war in syria. the assad regime was losing control of more and more territory, an
distance. >> and i saw soviet union falling apart. i saw russia being totally young country trying to build democracy but also trying to save whatever national wealth was there. it was very difficult to understand. was it just gas, oil, was it rivers and forests, was it a vast, vast country, huge territory but also culture. i represent maybe not such a group of people which talks every day but it was a group of people which always reminded everyone that use your culture, it may be biggest loss you have. of course national resources always, people talk, oh, energy, of course, important important today for everyone in the world. what about culture? we think it's always important to have both. >> yeah and your responsibility is for its culture. >> i do my best and i perform quite often. >> so is your friend vladimir putin responsive to that? >> i think he supports. first of all i done see him often maybe three, four times a year, i have known him for 20 year, long before he was a president. >> in saints petersburg of course. i was rather nonman already then because i lead such an institution.
fasten our seat belts. ed to >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": a ban on adoptions from russia; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the labor department reported the number of new claims for unemployment benefits fell this week to the lowest level since march of 2008. president obama is urging dockworkers and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season
the administration thought it had to take a lot more assertive action. >> what is the pressure of russia, on moscow to dole with this? they've been backing their ally syria. where are they? >> secretary clinton met with the foreign minister of russia a couple of days ago. obviously russia has backed another loser, its propensity in these things. i think they even see this now. probably the best-case scenario is there's some sort of soft landing where assad is offered an exile deal, gets out of the picture. and then you start the retribution massacres and it could turn into something extremely ugly. the hope is russia will get on board and be constructive. the foreign minister said good things but we'll see what russia does. >> what does an intervention looks like? >> if chemical weapons are used, i think it looks a lot like the air strikes in libya. you have to destroy some of those major stockpiles of chemical weapons. if they start to lose control and there are fores that hezbollah might get ahold of them, you might see some special forces on the ground. the idea of chemical weapons, especially f
to parliament, he also said russia needed to reverse its population decline or fall apart. daniel sandford reports. [speaking russian] >> showing few signs of recent back problems, vladimir putin strolled into one of the great halls of the kremlin for a speech that cements a new era of his leadership, and he suggests head upon the need to address russian population decline, a loss of more than 7 million people in just 20 years. >> of russia wants to be sovereign and power, there needs to be more of us, and we need to be better. >> this has been a difficult year for him with hundred thousand -- with hundreds of thousands of protesters taking to the streets to challenge his leadership, and he accused the opposition of being funded from overseas. >> foreign interference in russian politics is unacceptable, whether it is direct or indirect. those who get foreign funding for activities cannot be funded in russia. >> although vladimir putin won comfortably in this year's elections, this was a crucial moment, a chance to set the tone, to stabilize the government after a year of protests and disse
has denied any intention of using chemical weapons. russia, a key syrian ally, dismissed the intelligence reports as rumors. yesterday in istanbul, russian president vladimir putin said he understands turkey's concerns about border security, but he warned that deploying patriot missiles could raise fears of a wider conflict. meanwhile, inside syria intense fighting flared again near damascus today. amateur video showed government warplanes carrying out new arrayeds. the syrian capital has seen escalating violence in the last week as rebels try to close the noose on president bashar al assad's regime and the military tries to recapture lost ground. amid the fighting, the state news agency reported that rebel more tar fire killed nine students and a teacher at a school outside damascus today. the opposition also reported the incident but did not say who fired the mortar. meanwhile, there are meanwhile, there are indications that russia's position on syria may be changing. the "new york times" reports that the russians had agreed to a new strategy to persuade president assad
now mr. vitaly churkin. he is russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe the situation in syria? >> well, you know i think he went on saying that the syrian government seems to be losing ground in the fighting with the opposition and i think this is obvious. but i don't think there is anything in that statement which one can welcome or not welcome. first of all, that doesn't mean that the trouble will end any time soon. the fighting may continue for a very long time still and the battle may keep going this way or the other way for a long time because you will recall when the crisis started the predictions were that it will last for two to four months and president assad is going to be toppled but that did not happen. another important thing to remember is that even if the current stage of the crisis were to end in the so-called victory of the oppositi
to syria at a conference in ireland. russia has been a key player. do you understand whether the russians are getting closer to a western position when it comes to assad's future? >> if they are common their remarks from the meeting did not seem to suggest that they were prepared to go the extra mile or make some kind of deal. the issue is the fact that the u.n. security council is paralyzed. paralyzed over this whole issue of syria. the western countries have one position. russia and china have another. both sides actually need to move. holding on to positions that do not work. and the absence of a security council resolution means the joint u.n./terribly peace mission -- the joint u.n.-piece -- the joint u.n.-arab league peace mission is at a standstill it is hard for them to make progress. if they cannot make progress, then as things began to fragment here, more people die and the big worry is that syria might even descend into being a failed state. >> and now we go to retired general james dupnik at the institute for the study of war. thank you for coming in, general. how much do we k
.s. is exploring with allies and russia for instance, today. as we reported in the "new york times," the administration is communicating through russia to syria against not only using these chemical weapons but against these type of attacks. >> rose: how do you measure the relationship between the united states and russia on this particular question where they have in a sense -- they are very precise about what they say and they say they are opposed to somebody coming into the country. they're not, as they say, wedded to the assad government. >> that's right. they've taken a different position over the last several months in they're not necessarily wedded to that government. however syria remains the largest arms customer for russian weapons exports. the russians use a military base, a naval base on the syrian coast so they were very important in that sense. but russia obviously wants to maintain influence in the middle east and through syria and if they can't do it through assad regime, perhaps another regime that would still be willing to deal with them could be acceptable. >> ro
, with russia and china, containment when it came to russia was countering their expansive capabilities. >> rose: right. >> our own -- when it came to their nuclear capability we were talking about deterrence. >> rose: right. >> and so i think first we want to contain iranian influence in the region, but i think the question that people are -- that what the president is really addressing is, or would we be content with deterrence? >> right. >> and there i think the difference in the ayatollahs and their religious, their they cratic approach to the world, their threats to destroy israel make them a more worrisome, significantly more worrisome possess sorry of nuclear weapons than other nuclear states. >> rose: because they have a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the
's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warn
. going to africa and compete with the chinese. i can go to russia and say i can manage the risk-reward equation. so that's where a lot of new consumers are and i would say that is a core competency of a multibusiness big company like g.e. so i'd say it's more than those two but those two are important. >> rose: you once said to me tell me what the global economy will look like and the domestic economy will look like and i can can tell you what g.e. will do. >> uh-huh. >> rose: look ahead to the global economy today and tell me how you see it, where it's going and pra what are the prospects for growth? >> i think the world always revolves around a couple fundamentals. one is where are the people? demographics rule. at times when the u.s. grew the fastest was times when the population was also growing the fastest. so the fact there that there's a billion new consumers joining the middle-class in the next five or ten years, you bet be with them. the second is the cost of materials so basically in in the '90s oil was $15 a barrel for a decade. now it's $80 or $100 or $120. there's a
along the syrian-turkish border. >> russia is the one fly in the right man. the foreign minister said he would not block the move. a sign an old ally may be losing patience with president assaad. they hope deploying missiles will help stabilize tensions but the bigger concern is what is happening inside syria itself. specifically, what the regime might do with its stockpile of chemical weapons. syria has used much of its considerable arsenal to crush the rebellion. hidden from view it is believed to have developed a chemical weapons program and there are reports of activity, prompting this uncompromising western message. >> we are concerned for the same reason the united states has. we have sent our own clear, private message directly to them about the serious consequences that would follow from the use of such weapons. >> those consequences are not been spelled out and syria has said it is no intention of using chemical weapons but the deployment of patriot missiles that will take weeks to arrive in turkey will not end this conflict. >> how serious is this koepp merkel wegmanchemical we
if he does that. the world will not give him refuge in russia or elsewhere the problem is if he is losing control, if he is using air bases, if this stuff in there in the hands of jihadists, we really have an issue. that is with the u.s. and turkey and others are worried at seizing it before it happens, because otherwise we will have al qaeda an-- >> i don't disagree. there will be international action taken, no question about it. >> on this one we cannot lead from behind. we will have to lead from a head. >> i want to talk about 2016. that's right, 2016. >> i am still convinced that the overwhelming majority of our people want what my parents had, a chance. >> that is senator marco rubio of florida, one of the leading contenders, among the chattering classes anyway, for the 2016 republican presidential nomination, along with paul ryan. among the democrats, a lot of talk about hillary clinton. is rubio trying to redefine the republican party, colby? ->> he is trying to put distance between himself and what their standard bearer did with the 47% in being the plutocrat and showing
. for the last two weeks, a volcano in russia has erupted. the country's far eastern peninsula is one of the world's most volcanic regions. the local people have been fleeing with the latest activity. the first time, it has been spewing hot lava in nearly four decades. >> fire from the frozen earth. the volcano last erupted 36 years ago and this time it is the biggest ever. 200 tons of law but is pouring out. destroying a nearby scientific camps. 29 active volcanoes. it is such a pristine landscape that is listed as a world heritage site and it is not usually quite this dramatic. >> i was in shock and it looks like some sort of armageddon. the way the law but is slowing down towards you, as high as a five story house. >> the threat level has been downgraded from red orange. emergency services are taking the situation seriously. warning local residents to stay vigilant. for those living in the shadow of the volcano, they are not taking any chances. >> we are ready to go at any time. >> despite the warnings, the chance to see lava up close is not to be missed. bbc news. >> after days of
from potential missile attacks from syria. this comes as russia is backtracking on yesterday's statement that the opposition might actually win there. >> syrian forces bombing rebel positions on the turkish border earlier this year. the wounded brought across to the turkish side. syrian shells have landed on turkish territory itself also causing casualties. it could be vulnerable to serbian missile fire, turkey asked to protect against any such threat, we are deploying two patriot battalions here to turkey, along with the troops that are necessary to man those batteries. so that we can help turkey had a missile defense that they may very well need in dealing with threats that come out of syria. >> the american defense secretary announcing that the u.s. was joining germany and benevolence in providing patriot missiles. does this risk raising the stakes? >> i see these as predominantly a defensive move. i think the assad regime knows it is a defensive move. they can theoretically be used to shoot down planes, this is probably not going to happen. they are far too expensive to u
pictures from russia. this is the volcano erupting on a peninsula. it suddenly burst to life, pouring who lava and sending clouds of ash into the air. experts say the eruptions were caused when a 5 kilometer crack appeared, and it is unclear when the a robson might end. that brings the program to -- end.the eruption might that brings the program to a close. from all of us here, thank you for watching, and please tune in. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry you operate in, helping to provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise in a wide range of solutions. what can we do for you? hi, neighbor! we're going to pick vegetables from our school garden. and then miss elaina's coming over for dinner. i'm excited to be with you, and i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon found
. this is russia, where temperatures have fallen 15 degrees below average. in siberia, temperatures as much as -50 degrees celsius. over 80 people have died there. moscow expects temperatures to reach zero degrees celsius this coming thursday. you are watching "bbc world news." still to come, cutting christmas down to size. we will find out how it is changing china. is the season to engage in psychological warfare. and least, that is the accusation being made by north korea against its neighbors to the south, and it has to do with a christmas tree just west of seoul, korea, and the problem is that can be seen miles away in north korea. the north has threatened to the south with retaliation but has not said how exactly. children in one town have been given their christmas presents by elephant at their school. they enjoy the festivities. it is a regular feature of the town, but it was canceled because of flooding. now, when would you need an ax to go swimming? well, here is one example. this is north of the capital of berlin. they were breaking up the ice and then taking a dip. you are watching "bbc
for russia's weapons that were made for were times that anybody can get. >> i think all that is true. i do think the change in the commitment laws over the last 30 or 40 years has made it very difficult to compel someone to get treatment or be detained in a mental institution. these killers, is not as if there is a lack of funds for treatment. it is the lack of the ability of a parent would obviously have been a child, to go through the legal loopholes, is such that it is almost impossible. you end up with the tucson shooter who everyone spoke about. they had a sense he was psychotic. on guns, the problem is this. unless you are willing to completely disarm the population, as you do in canada or britain or australia did in the 1990's, and that it works and you have a decrease in gun crimes, if you allow grandfather of existing weapons, as would happen with the 1994 assault weapons law, at which time there were 25 million of the high- capacity magazines already in circulation, you do not accomplish anything. the studies of the 10-year experiment with the ban on assault weapons in the 1990's
. and then when re-elected as president again of planet earth's biggest nation, russia. vladimir putin biggest winner of 2012. >> "biggest loser," pat? >> general david petraeus. cia most famous general of his generation caught in a honey trap and kwon. >> the nra national rifle association which has no answer to why americans should be allowed to buy and possess assault weapons with rounds they can shoot off and kill little children. >> mark. >> the 23 million americans who remain out of work and have been out of work for a long period of time. >> seldom aidle son who backed candidates with millions of dollars, including mitt romney, and though lost. >> how many millions? >> all total? >> five or something? i think it's in the neighborhood of the 70s. >> yeah. >> right. he is moving along. the biggest loser of 2012 lance armstrong for using performance-enhancing drugs. armstrong was stripped of his tour de france titles and sponsor contracts worth 15 to $18 million. biggest loser. >>> okay. best politician. >> wisconsin governor scott walker. he put through his right to work laws. he didn't w
to ensure the candles stay burning throughout christmas day. russia has officially opened a new pipeline from its oil fields to a port on the pacific coast. the siberia pacific ocean pipeline links oil fields near tishet to the port of kosmino near the chinese border. it will reduce its dependence on the european market. president michael putnam said it will -- wladimir putin says it will be a boost to the economy. >> in sports, pakistan has beaten india by five wickets. a huge operation in place for the match. the pab santana team is touring independent yay for the first time in five years. 5,000 security personnel were deployed for the game. bomb squad officers carrying out inspections in and around the area. the government is going to issue a record 3,000 visas. it is the first since the human attacks in 2008. in india the funeral has taken place of a police officer killed in a protest in delhi over the weekend. much of the capital is locked down after demonstrations after the violent rape of a student last week. here is our report. >> a send-off with full state honors for an officer
points to close at 3022. russia is resisting the latest u.s. appeal to help force syrian president bashar al-assad out of office. that word came today in the russian newspaper, "kommersant." it said moscow is convinced assad will not go voluntarily, no matter what pressure is applied. meanwhile, u.s. defense secretary leon panetta said chances of the syrian regime resorting to chemical weapons may be easing. he spoke during a flight to kuwait. we have seen not seen anything new indicating any aggressive steps to move forward in that way, but we continue to monitor it very closely. we continue to make clear to them that they should not under any means make use of these chemical weapons against their own population. >> sreenivasan: also today, the united nations reported the number of syrian refugees fleeing the fighting has grown to more than 500,000, all across the middle east. and inside syria, rebels captured a second major military base near the northern city of aleppo. new details have emerged from south africa on the health of former president nelson mandela. the government announced
don't think we know. i think it is unclear. certainly you heard russia this week sort of seeing the writing on the wall. maybe our great ally isn't going -- isn't going to stay maybe assad will fall. those were the strongest words we heard, which is another indication that might happen. >> martha, you talked about retribution and the fact all sides will destroy everything in their path. side gets cornered and there's talk about chemical weapons. is that in play, he could use chemical weapons? >> i think that is the absolute key here. two weeks ago -- it was two weeks ago, right, chemical weapons, the u.s. intelligence spotted the syrian regime putting chemicals, putting precursors of chemicals in actual bombs and they were near airfields and that scared everybody. that's the day you saw president obama come out. intelligence in the last couple of weeks since then, they aren't as worried but those chemicals can last in those so i think that threat is out. there's nothing that scares the u.s. more than that. he would probably if he used chemical weapons and was backed into a corne
. and thanks to the internet, internationally orders coming in from fresno to france, from roanoke to russia. it seems once they taste it, well-- >> my mom always said word of mouth is the best advertisement. >> particularly when the words taste so good. >> mike: there is no business that is recession proof but there is one that comes close: pets, and all the stuff people buy for them. americans spent over $50 billion on their pets in 2011, the largest chunk of that on food. there are more of them than kids and we spend more on them than on our husbands and wives. pets. and if the slow-food movement is all the rage for humans than sparky, bucky, cuddles, and toots aren't far behind. >> it is totally inspired with what we were doing with our own food. things that we were buying inspired we should be applying these same ideas to the pet food, the fact that we only eat local and our pet food should be local as well. we thought pet owners would like that idea. >> mike: they did, in large numbers. so large, five-year-old san francisco-based small batch pets is one of the fastest growing companies
and russia working there. we were told that we could earn $200 a month. >> ( translated ): i can't say i was very happy or excited. i worried a bit because we were heading for a foreign country. we hoped everything would be okay. >> narrator: turkey has become one of the largest markets for women trafficked from ukraine and the old soviet bloc. its lax visa requirements make it an easy port of entry to europe and the middle east for traffickers like olga. >> she got through customs with absolutely no problem. the traffickers who transport these women have a very easy time of it. because the women know that they're going to be working illegally in the country that they're going to, they actually help the trafficker by lying to the customs officials. at this point we didn't know exactly what she was going to do. she didn't know where she was going to go. we didn't know what kind of vehicle she would have. all we knew is that she often goes to a cafe and sells the girls. that's what we had heard. >> narrator: the plan is to keep on olga's trail in istanbul and see where the women in her gro
concerns that china, russia, and others will seek new limits on internet access. the head of the u.n. regulatory agency insisted such claims are "completely untrue." concerns about flooding eased in northern california today, despite heavy downpours over the weekend. the region has had three powerful storms in the last week. as much aan inch of rain an hour fell in some communities yesterday. rivers swelled, but the storm moved faster than expected so flooding wasn't as bad as it could have been. still, strong winds downed trees, leaving some 57,000 people without power. some 20,000 public school students in five states will spend more time in the classroom next year. they're part of a pilot program announced today in colorado, new york, massachusetts, connecticut, and tennessee. a total of 40 schools will add at least 300 hours to the standard school calendar. the goal is to see whether more time will make american students more competitive on a global level. britain welcomed news today that prince william and his wife catherine are expecting their first child. the announcement sa
with the opposition. on the syrian diplomatic front, secretary of state hillary clinton said today russia and the u.s. will support new efforts to mediate peace. but clinton underscored that the u.s. still insists that president bashar assad leave power. she spoke today in northern ireland, a day after meeting with russian foreign minister sergei lavrov and the u.n. envoy for syria, lakhdar brahimi. >> we reviewed the very mr. brahimi had his own additional information to contribute about what he is hearing from sources inside syria and both minister lavrov and i committed to support a renewed push by brahimi and his team to work with all the stakeholders in syria to begin a political transition. meanwhile, rebels in syria made the damascus international airport an official battleground. they said it's a legitimate target and they urged civilians to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for t
of a possible shift in russia's position, the decision did not go down well in moscow, which opposes outside action against the assad regime. foreign minister sergei lavrov: >> ( translated ): as the coalition has been recognized as the only legitimate representative, it seems that the united states decided to place all bets on the armed victory of this very national coalition. >> ifill: but no weapons have been promised, and a spokesman for the coalition said it needs real support. the u.s. has resisted sending arms, amid fears they might wind up in the hands of islamic extremist groups. just this week, washington branded one such group-- the al- nusra front-- an offshoot of al qaida in iraq. but the head of the opposition council said today the islamist fighters are partly responsible for the latest rebel gains. >> ( translated ): the decision to consider one of the fronts facing off to the regime as a terrorist group needs reconsideration. we insanely love our country and while we may disagree with some on their thought process and politics, we affirm that all weapons used by the revolut
in russia, on wall street that there was something in the air. that we've seen all through this year that some spirit of rebellion, some spirit of rebellion against the establishment and i wanted to try to tap into that. >> rose: tim cook was a finalist was he? >> tim cook came by for an interview last week. part of it was animated by the fact that steve jobs famously bemoan it had fact that he was never person of the year and i thought -- >> rose: why wasn't he? >> well, i guess the timing was never right he thought he was going to be person of the year in 1984. that the computer was going to be the thing of the year and i thought about steve last year but, of course, he died during the year. we've never put a dead person as person of the year before and i didn't think that was a great -- >> rose: so you missed the opportunity so therefore -- >> so therefore i thought -- i wanted people to look at tim cook. he's had an hay maizing year, he's doubled the market cap of apple since steve died. the number of launches over the past year has been extraordinary and i think he's an interest
yesterday." the president of russia vladimir putin put new distance today between his government and the regime in syria. in his annual news conference, putin insisted his country is not protecting syrian president bashar assad. he urged assad to hold talks with the opposition, and negotiate an end to the bloodshed. >> ( translated ): we are not concerned about the fate of assad's regime. we understand what is going on there and that his family has been in power for 40 years. the changes are undoubtedly needed. we are worried about a different thing-- what next? we simply don't want the current opposition, having become the authorities, to start fighting the people who are the current authorities and become the opposition and we don't want this to go on forever. >> sreenivasan: on another matter, putin indicated he plans to sign a law banning u.s. adoptions of russian children. that move is retaliation for a new u.s. law aimed at punishing russian human rights violators. in u.s. economic news, growth during the summer quarter was better than first estimated. the commerce departme
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)